5 Rules for Presenting Design Concepts to Clients

The 5 Rules for Presenting Design Concepts to Clients

Problem Solving

The 5 Rules for Presenting Design Concepts to Clients

Why do customers look to pick your minimal custom design solution? It may be how you present your design ideas that cause the problem.we are here to present 5 Rules for Presenting Design Concepts to Clients.
As designers, we understand how to motivate people through communication. However, sometimes we forget when it comes to our own work. Poorly presented the best design will kill an idea. To avoid this fall, designers need to consider the psychology behind their client’s decision making. When presenting ideas, designers usually have the solution they want. I can also tell you that most designers do not generally choose their favorite idea. Sometimes it goes unnoticed due to reasonable concerns from the customer, but may be due to the way you delivered it to the customer.

Here are five rules to use when presenting design ideas. Never show a bad idea the first and most important rule is to never show work that you do not want to be associated with. Events where the customer chooses the most favorite design are more than just myths, so do not position yourself in a position where you have to take a design approach in advance. Advice from educator, educator, and designer Ellen Shapiro: “Never show off something that the customer does not want to choose. If in doubt, take it out. ”

2. Rule Three If you are a design legend, you can come to a meeting and present an idea (instead of a group of them, like the rest). Most of us don’t have that luxury and our customers don’t expect it. The rule of thumb is the most tried and true method of presenting ideas. Creating three options implies additional work as it requires the designer to produce ideas that do not reflect the best solution, but then reduces the chance of bastardizing the desired design in the process because the designer has control over the compromises they want to make. Usually, the customer will pick somewhere in the middle.

Customer’s choice: It has a solid design that does not cause boredom, but does not challenge the customer much. This is usually the “customer asked” type.
Designer’s Choice: This is the design that the designer considers the best solution. It is generally a very creative solution that balances the needs of the business and the audience.
“Wow” design: This option pulls stops, pushes boundaries, and challenges the customer to think beyond the norm. This option is probably not selected, but it allows you to expand the conversation about what is possible.

3. Environment Scott Young of Perception Research Services advises that designers should be humiliated by offering themselves and their client’s multiple design packages at once. The problem with this approach is that it turns the presentation into a “beauty contest” that stimulates design aesthetics as opposed to design aesthetics, as opposed to focusing on design strategy. A great approach is to show work related to competitors, thereby shifting the conversation from “Which opinion looks best” to “Which opinion gives us a competitive advantage”.

Young advises that it is better to avoid conversations about design aesthetics, but rather to focus on the brand and its content in a holistic way.3. Eco Scott Young of Perception Research Services advises that designers should be humiliated by offering themselves and their customer’s multiple design packages at once. The problem with this approach is that it turns the presentation into a “beauty contest” that stimulates design aesthetics as opposed to design aesthetics, as opposed to focusing on design strategy. A great approach is to show work related to competitors, thereby shifting the conversation from “Which opinion looks best” to “Which opinion gives us a competitive advantage”. Young also advises that it is better to avoid conversations about design aesthetics, but rather to focus on the brand and its content in a holistic way.

4. Conceptrap Swan, senior vice president of brand image and executive creative director, has a definite rule in his studio: Every concept presented to a customer has a name. “If you can’t name a concept, you know nothing there,” Swann explains. “If you can not name the driving concept behind the design, it’s just aesthetic.” The name provides a clear view of what you see in the design on the way back to the strategy.

5. Focus on the problem, not the aesthetic. The first step in delivering is to show the customer that you understand the problem with which the design is intended. By reviewing the success criteria established at the beginning of the project, you align the client’s thinking so that you share a common mindset. When you show work, focus on some key ideas that support success criteria. If the client does not ask, do not dwell on design elements such as typography or other design specifications. The customer wants to know more about how the customer meets his needs. Discussing design is a trap that many designers fall into. They believe the customer is interested in the layout grid and typography. Discussing things like this invites the client to art directly into the project, which is never desirable. Focus on the problem, not the aesthetic. The first step in delivering is to show the customer that you understand the problem with which the design is intended.

By reviewing the success criteria established at the beginning of the project, you align the client’s thinking so that you share the general mood. When you show off your work, focus on some key ideas that support the criteria for success. If the client does not ask, do not dwell on design elements such as typography or other design specifications. The customer wants to know more about how the customer meets his needs. Discussing design is a trap that many designers fall into. They believe the customer is interested in the layout grid and typography. Discussing things like this invites the client to art directly into the project, which is never desirable.

6. Be the person “I always come in person” says designer, educator, and writer Petrula Vrondikis. “I hate to deliver in PDF format. This is the weakest way to publish your work to the world. You have no control over how the client looks at the PDF and handles the PDF. It is completely out of your control. They show it to a few who are not involved and receive scattered feedback. ”Vrondikis comps and discusses with the client, but usually takes comps with her when he leaves the meeting. His reason for doing so was not distrust of his client, but the purpose of the meeting was to review comps in a professional context where he could appear to answer questions.

Being a presenter is a combination of ideas and strategies. The ability to clearly present ideas to the customer is often the difference between success and failure, so it is worth planning and rehearsing. Snatching it or taking the presentation may affect your customer’s wishes. Providing your work professionally with set standards and ethics establishes you as an expert and empowered. Regardless of how good the design solution is, the customer should approach it in such a way that they have rationality for liking it.

 

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