The Role of Sketching in the Design Process

Sketching in the Design Process

How To Sketch

The Role of Sketching in the Design Process

As a tool or skill, sketching plays its part in the design process. That role will vary depending on the final product being created, the size and purpose of the project, the style, experience, and workflow of the individual designer, and the customer’s expectations. Learn more about how paintings are used in the design process within multiple design categories.
The role of painting in digital art will vary depending on the websites, labels, examples, product ideas or other designs you create. A description or logo may require more sketches than a website.
A large project with significant client budget benefits from sketching throughout the design process. This ensures that a direction is first agreed with the customer before too much time is invested in refining a solution. Let’s start with the basic ideas and start painting loosely. Then work on the lyrics or layouts. Once those directions are selected, the ideas can be further refined with a detailed sketch.

5 uses for sketching in design

There are many uses for painting in the design process. Below is a review of five types of applications with examples and links.

1. Rapid concept development

A great way to explore ideas quickly. You can draw in an hour or two and create several possible solutions to the design problem. This is an important step in the design process. This will save you time to work through the ideas in the paper before going to the computer. Although it is possible to create sketches on a computer, it is not as fast as drawing multiple ideas on paper.
In the article Bio Trekker Logo Design Sketches, designer Carly Barrett shows us how he used difficult sketches for logo design improvement. He explores more than 60 possible solutions before cutting down on ideas for a few great ideas. It is interesting how he explores iconic images, typography, and layout.
He works through many ideas and searches for the best presentation of those ideas. Because she creates small sketches, she can work quickly and come up with many ideas in a relatively short period of time.

Sketching Of Logo Design
Sketching Of Logo Design

Product designers spend a lot of time painting. If you are going to design the next sports shoe, furniture or bike, the idea does not start on a computer, it starts on paper.
Commenting on the Bicycle Design blog, James says of sketching, “Putting ideas on paper quickly is the only way to evaluate them to see if they are worth exploring further. . “

thumbnail sketches
thumbnail sketches

2. Basic composition or layout

Quick way sketches to create the basic structure of your chart. They are also used in website design and graphic design to quickly evaluate layout choices. You can create a series of small sketches or they can be larger. As long as your paintings are good enough to capture the necessary elements, drawing skills are unnecessary.
In the tutorial on Creating a Cool Vintage Collage Design In Photoshop, Fabio explains how to make some sketches before going to the computer. As you can see below, he captures the basic layout on the left in a sketch. Compare the sketch with the final Photoshop image on the right. You can see the basic layout is designed on paper. The figure of the woman is represented by a stick figure on the map. Before opening Photoshop, amazing, or good, drawing skills are not required.

Creating A Cool Vintage Collage Design In Photoshop
Creating A Cool Vintage Collage Design In Photoshop

Web Design From Scratch is a popular website that offers practical tips for creating websites. In the article The Complete Fool’s Guide to Designing Websites, the author says of pencil sketching layouts: “Quick pencil sketch helps me to quickly record the look of what I have displayed in my head. As you can see below, drawing skills are not required to capture the layout, sketch on the bottom left, and final design on the right.

The Complete No-Nonsense Guide to Designing Web sites
The Complete No-Nonsense Guide to Designing Web sites

3. Customer communication and approval

Showing clients sketches or songs will save you a lot of time. This will be the project you want client approval for. If you are going to spend hours on an example, you need to make sure that the customer agrees with your choice of the design before moving on. Obtaining small approvals from customers is a common part of the example process. This is also common in large logo design projects and other projects.
SOS factory designs are mostly logo icons. Their workflow follows a pattern similar to that of a comic book design studio. The person who creates the paintings is often not the equivalent of the line worker. The designer, the colorist, the art director are all in different roles. They divide each character into specialties.
In this studio, Sketcher creates ideas and client edits with the art director and designer. The customer recognizes the artwork before moving on to the next stage of ink and coloring. This saves time by confirming an idea before moving on to the more advanced stages of the process. The example below is a concept developed based on initial client communication. This sketch is sent to the customer for approval or change requests. Once the sketch is complete, the design goes to the next stage of linework and then colors the character.

In the article from Sketch to Vector Illustration, Bill at Comedia explains how quickly they get customer approval. They send a series of approximate set sketches to the customer before drawing a more detailed sketch. On the left, you can see the client selection. A detailed sketch is made on the right before going to the computer.

From Sketch to Vector Illustration
From Sketch to Vector Illustration

4. Visual inspection

Sketching can be used as a journalism activity to record and explore your interests. It can also be used to explore the many options you can take in a particular design.
Sherry Thai has a portfolio at Goroflat. She has a section dedicated to sketches. These paintings show his visual explorations in many fields of design. In the sketch section of his portfolio, he visually explores topics such as design, labels, and tattoo styles.

Sherrie Thai Sketchbooks
Sherrie Thai Sketchbooks

Product Design Book Design Sketching Explains the whole process of painting for product design. It provides tutorials, explanations and examples. The example below from the book shows how a designer can investigate a problem and explore possible solutions.

Chapter Two; Investigative and Explorative Sketches from the book Design Sketching
Chapter Two; Investigative and Explorative Sketches from the book Design Sketching

5. Purification of visual solutions

Subsequent stages include the refinement of the process of creating a design or description. The overall concept and direction of the piece may work better, but not an element. Often, this can be further tightened and adjusted on more round diagrams. Of course, at some point a digital artist moves into the computer. The process of painting then moves to digital drafts.
In the article An Project with Angel D’Amico, you get a sense of how important sketching is in this project, but you can also see how seamlessly the artist moves to Photoshop. In some cases, the artist prefers digital solutions as more customer modifications are requested. The artist decides which medium will do the job faster by embracing a deadline.

I mentioned the article from Sketch to Vector Illustration a while ago. This is an excellent reference in this case. Bill discusses refinement charts before going to the computer. There is a section entitled “Some aspects of the chart often look bad. A professional artist will work again on a separate sheet until he gets the chart right”. He then explains his process.
In this situation, the artist has identified the need to rework a part of the painting. In some cases, this may be based on client request, such as Angel de Amigo above. Regardless of the reason, you will want a tight sketch for detailed work. Below is an excerpt from one of Bill’s tight paintings. He then brought the image to the computer to complete the process.

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